Celebration of Black History

April 10, 2013 by  
Filed under African American, Director's Blog

On Sunday, February 3, there was a joy filled Mass to celebrate Black History Month and the Day of Prayer for the African American and African Family, at St. Katharine Drexel Parish in Dorchester.  The main celebrant was Father Warren Savage a priest from the Diocese of Springfield, MA.  The Archdiocese of Boston Black Catholic Choir and the Nigerian Catholic Community Choir provided music for this Mass.

Gifts brought to the alter representing the aspects of the Black community of Boston.

Gifts brought to the altar representing the aspects of the Black community of Boston.

 

Before Mass started, the Nigerian Community Choir led everyone in a time of worship and praise.  Mass began with the singing of a traditional Spiritual, “Hush, Somebody’s Callin’ My Name.”   In his homily, Fr. Savage encouraged over 200 people who attended the mass to “Not only praise and sing to God on Sunday, but to stand for Christ every day of the week…” During the offertory, several gifts that represent aspects of the Black community of Boston were brought up to the altar: The Lead Me, Guide Me Hymnal, which represent the songs that have sustained and given hope to the African American community, a statue of our Blessed Mother, who is the mother of the Church, the mother of all and African cloth to represent the diverse cultures of Africa.  In addition, Fr. Savage led the community in a prayer for families of African descent.  After Communion, the Archdiocese of Boston Black Catholic Choir led in the singing of “Lift ev’ry Voice,” the Black National Anthem. After Mass, everyone went down to the lower church for dessert, coffee and fellowship.

 

Archdiocese of Boston Black Catholic Choir

Archdiocese of Boston Black Catholic Choir

Black History Month is a time to remember, celebrate and highlight the achievements and contributions of Blacks in the United States. The celebration of Black History month began in 1926 when historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History proclaimed that the second week of February should be “Negro History Week.” In 1976, the observance was expanded to the entire month of February.

Comments are closed.